Four Play: Play 4 – Get 1 Free!

October 1, 2014 by  
Filed under Featured, News

We just can’t help giving stuff away for free at 32Red Poker. This month, for example, during our Four Play promotion, which will run throughout October, we’ll be handing out free entry to two of our most popular tournaments, namely The Mosh Pit and Big Night In. And it’s not rocket science – simply play either of these tournaments four or more times this month and you’ll receive a free buy-in ticket to have another go in November (note that a free tickets will be awarded on November 3rd).

Poker tournaments come in various formats, and these two have a distinctive feel that has proven rather popular.

The Mosh Pit (€8,000 Guaranteed) is a daily rebuy tournament with a €22 buy-in and €20 rebuys. It is the nature of rebuy events that they can be fast and furious and, with a juicy prize fund on offer, the aptly named Mosh Pit is no exception. There are plenty opportunities to make the money (and earn your free entry) during the course of the month because this tournament is held every night at 7pm UK time. There are also satellites that provide discount qualification thanks to buy-ins as low as €2.20.

Meanwhile, our Big Night In (€7,000 Guaranteed) is exactly that. Starting at 8pm UK time – also nightly – this is a different set-up, being a deep-stacked freezeout with a total buy-in of €110. Again, satellites are available, from as little as €5.50, and the freezeout aspect lends itself to a quite different approach than the more bloodthirsty Mosh Pit.

As well as being able to earn free tickets just for playing four tournaments, you’ll also have the opportunity to take advantage of additional freebies this month, as we’ll be giving away over €10,000 in free tickets to both these tournaments! Satellites are always worth a go in order to sit down to play big money tournaments at bargain buy-in prices, but there’s even more incentive this month because, throughout October, we will be adding value to some of our Mosh Pit and Big Night In satellites in the shape of additional tickets! Indeed the total added value during the month will be over €10,000, so don’t forget to check out these value added satellites to make the most of the Four Play promotion.

Click here to find out more, and good luck at the tables!

Thinking Poker

September 30, 2014 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

How far do you think ahead? Indeed, do you bother considering how a hand could pan out from street to street or – more to the point – your potential influence on the direction it might take? Poker obviously has a luck element in the form of the ‘unknowns’ but, crucially, there’s far more to the game than waiting for each new card to appear and making adjustments and decisions based rather simplistically on how each new arrival relates to our holding.

We need to experience a level of control as a hand progresses (if we don’t we can be sure someone else will) and this clearly requires some serious aforethought. Moreover, with one of the chief characteristics of online poker being the limited thinking time that keeps the game fluid, it’s imperative we try to think ahead in order to facilitate the decision making process as the temperature inevitably hots up. Note that there is a distinction between thinking and planning – the former means taking into account what might lie ahead and what our actions could be, while the latter is perhaps too specific and elusive.

Some hands are easier to weigh up – and their futures easier to anticipate – than others. Hitting a set, for example, affords us some flexibility but brings with it a rather simple choice of strategy. The common scenario of being dealt AK, on the other hand, is well worth investing time in before we even sit down at the virtual table. If we are in c, for instance, and throw in a raise, then we already know that we will bet a number of flops, regardless of whether we hit. Of course the better our position the wider our range, so we also need to think about the trickier and potentially very profitable hands with which we can win big pots by bypassing the opposition’s radar, a perfect example being calling late with suited connectors. The obvious train of thought revolves around how best to engineer a situation, when we hit big, to get the most out of the pot. But what do we do when our holding has no relation whatsoever with the flop? The ‘automatic’ response for most players is to put the brakes on, and herein lies the problem with not thinking sufficiently about the game because, in this particular scenario, part of our deliberate thinking should include our readiness to react to it being checked round to us by putting in a steal bet when we fail to hit. Adhering too closely to ABC-type poker by effectively limiting our options in advance due to a lack of proper consideration, rather than actively anticipating how we might most positively act as a hand evolves, is a considerable, cumulative error.

The more we grow used to thinking ahead, the better we can approach pre-flop decisions, with our range and pre-flop criteria eventually becoming a natural part of our post-flop thinking and overall strategy. Some holdings clearly have more post-flop mileage than others, and we learn to incorporate certain hands – and certain types of hands – into lines of thought that can subsequently be adjusted, as well as associate this or that hand with situations that can to some extent be confidently anticipated.

Good luck at the tables!

 

Angus Dunnington (AngusD at the tables)
32Red Poker Ambassador

No Limit Hold’em: Show No Mercy at Loose Tables!

April 15, 2014 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

We all have a favourite style of play, an approach that has proven more successful than others over time and is also best suited to our personality. However, flexibility is part of the game, and it’s imperative that we learn to both recognise the kind of players we’re up against and a table’s specific dynamic and so on and, subsequently, how to adapt in order to exploit others’ weaknesses.

One such example – especially in the modern game – presents itself when the table is populated exclusively by loose players. Many consider themselves loose-aggressive but, essentially, they tend simply to be much too loose because they get involved when they shouldn’t, constantly, and in so doing are losing players. Note that the psychological pitfall for these players is that when they win an enormous pot after filling a draw their mistaken logic supports the ill-fated notion that the ends justify the means when, in reality (in the long-run), the ends don’t come around sufficiently often to justify the accumulative investment in chasing big hands.

There’s a tendency when trying to profit from this common bad habit to revert to ultra-tight mode and get involved only when we find premium hands, but we don’t have to be so selective, and of course we must balance our game. But when we are in possession of a big hand we shouldn’t be afraid on a loose table to put in a big pre-flop raise – if the ‘standard’ is three big blinds, then doubling that with AA (and KK) won’t scare everyone off at this kind of table. We’re playing a bunch of loose players – they’re loose because they don’t worry about being tight and haven’t spent time contemplating ‘sensible’ bet sizes.

The key is strong bets with strong hands. If we raise with AK pre-flop and bring along two players for a flop containing an Ace and two suited cards, then we should remain aggressive and throw in a bet at least the size of the pot. Of course we could be pushing out of the hand a couple of opponents with lesser hands but there are worse things than picking up a three-way pot. However, habitually loose players can be more influenced by the promise of a draw than the fact they’re being asked to overpay for the privilege of chasing it and, while it might initially seem strange to practically announce our hand with a big bet, this is a good tactic on loose tables. What often happens against two players in this kind of situation is that one player will drop out and we will be left in a growing pot, with a significant lead, against a sole opponent erroneously committed to an over-priced cause.

We’ll see our big hands overtaken occasionally but that’s a mathematical characteristic of poker – as is the cast iron certainty that, over time, correct plays reward us with profit. Sets and other powerhouses should be bet big, with no mercy, the price we insist on the opposition paying being at least the size of the pot – otherwise we’re indulging loose players and justifying their poor play. Results in poker are determined by dealing with this or that scenario better than the opposition.

We should keep in mind, too, when contemplating value, that when we have small pairs or suited connectors, for example, we don’t catch the chasing bug by paying too much to see the flop. Position is yet again a major factor when looking to exploit the potential of speculative hands as cheaply as possible.

Good luck at the tables!

 

 

 

 

Angus Dunnington, 32Red Poker Ambassador

No Limit Strategy: Draws on the Flop

March 21, 2014 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

Finding ourselves on a flush draw when the flop appears leaves us with a decision to make at a critical juncture of a hand. Given that it is by no means an uncommon situation it pays – literally – to have a logical strategy regarding flush and straight draws.

Of course there needs to be some level of flexibility as well as an appreciation of the odds but, essentially, betting is a worthy play because it has the advantage if ticking numerous boxes. We should be looking to avoid being predictable, finding value, throwing off the opposition’s scent as to what we might have, wangling ourselves a free run at the Turn and simply pick up a pot uncontested. Not surprisingly this specific semi-bluff is one of our favourite scenarios in No Limit Hold’em.

A key component in engineering optimal prospects here is position. It’s imperative to have the advantage of position on our opponents in order to afford us maximum control of proceedings – otherwise, betting out of position runs the risk of walking into a raise from a strong – and made – hand, a problem that is more likely to arise the more players we’re up against.

Therefore, in position, we can be happy to bet our draw on the flop, regardless of how many players are still in contention. Clearly we can’t expect to win the pot against multiple opponents as someone is likely to already have a hand and be in front at this stage (ideally we would prefer to bet when it’s checked to us, but incorporating an occasional raise into our strategy is fine, too).

The interesting psychological aspect of this scenario is that players tend to associate a bet with a concrete connection to the flop which, in turn, can make the rest of the hand difficult for our opponents to read should we make the draw. If the Turn brings one of our cards we can choose how to play depending on circumstances. Checking might well induce some juicy action on the river, while simply betting makes sense – a sizeable bet could be construed as protecting ourselves against the opposition getting a lucky fourth flush card.

Note that, having ‘purposefully’ bet the flop, we can contemplate an ostensibly confident bet on the Turn even if we miss our draw. If we subsequently fill a flush on the river we can then be sitting on a well disguised winner. This type of situation is ripe for confusing opponents (always a useful tactic) and inducing action when we hit a big hand, either through slowing down when we hit on the Turn or representing a (lesser) made hand by betting earlier in the proceedings.

Good luck at the tables!

Angus Dunnington (AngusD at the tables)
32Red Poker Ambassador

No Limit Tournaments: When Tight Isn’t Right

February 21, 2014 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

Poker is such a rich game that, depending on the specific format we’re playing, a successful approach is by no means guaranteed to have the same results in an ostensibly similar scenario.This is true, for example, when considering the No Limit cash game and tournament scenarios. The conventionally accepted tight-aggressive strategy might be well suited to No Limit cash games (albeit not the only worthy approach) but, in today’s modern tournament environment – particularly online – we’re going to struggle to do better than make a minor cash if we adhere to this style too strictly.

Apart from the fact that strong holdings, by definition, come around all too rarely in this context, when we are ‘fortunate’ enough to be dealt a premium hand there is, of course, no guarantee that we are going to be rewarded with any significant action. For one reason, we have hitherto been inactive, which is already a good indication to the opposition that we’re holding something when we suddenly get involved, so they are likely to avoid commitment. And thus the cycle could well continue as the blinds inexorably rise and our stack diminishes. To compound the problem, there inevitably comes a point as the tournament progresses at which our waiting, safety-first policy seriously puts our tournament survival in jeopardy, let alone the prospects of finishing among the top prizes.

It’s simply not possible to realistically expect any level of success with a pure tight-aggressive approach. Indeed it is imperative to loosen up and experience the liberating experience for ‘too’ tight players that is broadening our starting hand range and indulging in the occasional bit of such delights as speculation and even slow-playing, for instance. This – enjoyable – strategy can begin as early as the opening stages, when the low(est) blind levels afford us considerable flexibility to mix up our game. Note that this also gives us the advantage of being able to engineer a deceptive table image.

As the blinds increase the pressure on just about everyone it makes sense to step up a gear. Instead of being overly cautious the key is to put yourself in other players’ shoes and appreciate that much of the opposition is going to be afraid, and rather than join them it’s much more important to exploit them. The phrase ‘you can’t make an omelette without breaking eggs’ is particularly apt when it comes to NL Hold’em tournaments

Good luck at the tables!

Angus Dunnington (AngusD at the tables)
32Red Poker Ambassador

No Limit Poker: When a Value Bet is a Loser

February 18, 2014 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

‘Value’ is often used in poker and, being such a sensible sounding word, tends to be incorrectly assigned to situations where ‘caution’ might be a more prudent subject matter. A very common example of this is when players, believing they have the best hand against a lone opponent, attempt to extract the maximum from a hand in which they have been making the running by raising the river for value.

Of course such a strategy may well add a few extra chips to the coffers but, alas, doing this kind of thing can be a recipe for disaster. Apart from laying ourselves open to a massive bet (bluff) that forces us to make an awkward decision, there is also a good chance that we are falling into a trap. And herein lies the crucial difference between value and a good old common sense slice of caution – a distinction that we come to appreciate with experience.

Here’s a typical example of this kind of scenario. We are dealt Ad Qd on the button and our standard raise is called by the big blind and a mid-position limper. The flop comes Ac 8d 5s, giving us top pair with an attractive looking kicker, a backdoor flush draw and, of course, we have the advantage of position. It’s checked around to us and we make a pot-sized bet which is called only by the big blind.

The turn throws up the 3d, which is both pretty innocuous and not exactly unwelcome as we now have a nut flush draw to add to our collection. The BB checks once again and, perhaps buoyed by the turn, we make another pot-sized bet which, again, is called. It’s by no means clear what our opponent is holding (maybe a flush draw), which is more troubling than we might assume because poker is all about information, and it can be more convenient to know we’re up against a strong hand than a complete unknown.

The river is the 5c and, breaking the rhythm of the pattern of play thus far, the BB bets around a quarter of the pot. If it was a – now unfulfilled – flush draw, this could be an attempted steal against our possible, albeit unlikely bluff. Alternatively, we might have been up against a poorly played pair of tens or even 8 9. Not only is this the kind of thinking we should adopt, but the process should have started earlier (in fact we should get used to it from the very beginning of a hand). It prevents us from, in a situation like this, now raising with our absolutely beatable top pair and being called by a holding like 8 5, thus wasting money. The possible hands we’ve just considered wouldn’t be calling a raise, and there’s a chance we could even finding ourselves calling a crafty re-raise here. Note that by raising we are also walking into hands such as AK. Moreover, even if we held AK ourselves a raise would still be foolhardy.

Essentially, a would-be value bet can end up being a losing bet, so beware, and listen out for those internal alarm bells that come with experience (and are heralded by a paired board!)

Good luck at the tables!

Angus Dunnington (AngusD at the tables)
32Red Poker Ambassador

No Limit Bullies: Run? Or Rope-a-dope?

February 10, 2014 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

Here’s a typical unpleasant poker experience – having eagerly anticipated sitting down to play a hopefully rewarding poker session (and with that familiar determination and confidence with which we tend to begin), perhaps after brushing up on our game, things soon don’t appear to be going as we had planned. Read more

The Transparency of the Minimum Raise…

February 3, 2014 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

No Limit Hold’em is so-called for a reason – unlike Limit poker, where our betting choices are defined by the limit put on how much we can add to the pot at each betting juncture, NL affords us literally unlimited flexibility.

However, when presented with such an abundance of choice we are also given the opportunity to make mistakes, and the minimum raise is one such fundamental part of the NL game that in some respects – for the vast majority of players – is best avoided altogether.

Let’s see why… Read more

Short-handed No Limit Poker Tips

January 16, 2014 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

Years ago, when first introduced to online poker, we would start off on the No Limit path by sitting down at full-ring games, where the conventional, solid ABC approach tends to be a good foundation on which to build a repertoire of strategies. It’s a good idea to do the same today, not least because it teaches us to have patience and appreciate the (relative) value of starting hands.

However, short-handed poker is so popular now that we tend to try out the murkier waters of 6-player tables earlier in our careers, and it’s important to appreciate the implications of there being fewer players at the table. Read more

Flush Royale Jackpot Hit!

January 3, 2014 by  
Filed under News

Jackpots are good. The word in itself already conjures up a bit of excitement, and the prospect of hitting a jackpot adds a bit of spice to the game, whether it’s for a Bad Beat (when a big hand ‘loses’ to a bigger hand) or for finding yourself with a Royal Flush, as is the case for 32Red’s fun Flush Royale tournament, where a whopping €1000 is waiting for anyone who manages to hit poker’s magical hand using both hole cards.

One such player who did this – and on New Year’s Eve, no less – is LuckyRacoon (yes – someone called Lucky saw good fortune come his way; funny old world). No doubt happy to see in the New Year by playing in the well structured, €250 Guaranteed tournament, LuckyRacoon was dealt Ad Qd, got jiggy with it and the flop came Ah Kd 9s. His opponent had K9 and thus hit two pair, and the poker gods sent through the ether the Jd on the turn and then what must have been a beautiful looking Td to complete the royal flush. And with it a welcome €1000 jackpot.

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He had this to say:  It was a great start to my 2014, when on New Years eve, i played the 32Red Flush Royale tournament, starting at 9pm, and gaining popularity, day, by day, including a few 32Red regs, and thanks to 1 regular (Juicy-puice) hitting Her 2 pair on the flop, helped me to see the river card, and very fortunately, i hit my royal flush, and in so doing, i had a nice little bonus of €1000. I bubbled the prize pool, but felt only fair to the rest of the players; can’t be too greedy ;)

A big thanks goes out to Nick Diaz, and all at 32Red, for putting on great promotions, and i hope they all continue. You have now got one great big fan :)

For those looking to get their hands on the jackpot, the Flush Royale tournament is held every night at 9pm (UK time) and has a buy-in of €5+1, 1500 starting chips, 8-minute rebuys, €5 rebuys (1500 chips) and a €7.50 add-on (3000 chips).

Good luck at the tables!Luck

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