Get Your Hands on Added Sit & Go Booty

November 4, 2014 by  
Filed under Featured, News

Not very much tends to happen in November, so we’re spicing it up at 32Red Poker by adding money to the prize funds of our bankroll-friendly Sit & Go tournaments. This format is popular among both beginners and more experienced players, being simultaneously exciting and instructive. Sit & Go poker is also good for when you don’t have a great deal of time but still want to play, allowing you to enjoy the poker tournament experience in a small field, even lending the proceedings a final table feel.

Play our promotional Sit & Go tournaments during November and you’ll have the chance to boost your winnings by getting your hands on added prize money. If you fancy the gladiatorial strategy found in Heads-Up poker, then these are included in our promotion, too. See the Sit & Go lobby to find the tournaments that are eligible, as well as how much money is added to the prize fund.

If you’re new to S&Gs, a good tip is to keep your powder dry during the earlier blind levels and not slip into the habit of calling with decent looking but not very strong hands. There’s also no need to panic when one or two players seem to be forging ahead with big stacks – the important thing is how many players are still in contention, and having a stack that can do some damage. The mission, of course, is to finish in the money and make a profit – in this case a bigger than usual profit.

Click here to find our more.

Tournaments: Short-handed versus Full-table (Part 1)

May 15, 2012 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

Picture the old guard tournament warrior, treating chips with utmost care and waking up only when very favourable opportunities present themselves. No indulgent pre-flop calls out of position, no fancy stuff with the likes of 73o because it’s a ‘lucky’ hand (remember: there’s no such thing), no ego-fuelled pre-flop betting wars that mean going all-in with 44…

Patience, patience and an extra dollop of patience for good measure was the recipe for success in the good old days. Aggression was of course a key factor but it was selective, well-timed and served a purpose.

Times have changed, both online and off. Solid play is still going to bring some sort of success, but our definition of ‘aggression’ has shifted considerably to allow for a more flexible approach.

Catering for the modern, hyper-aggressive cut-and-thrust environment, the introduction of short-handed games – for both cash and tournaments – proved immensely popular. With both types of table format now available we can choose how many players we’re up against, yet many still fail to make the adjustment from full to short-handed.

The fundamental difference between short-handed and full-table tournaments is, obviously, the fact that the blinds travel round the table at more speed, forcing us to contribute to the pot a third of the time. We’re obliged to be part of the action more often and, consequently, we can’t afford for patience to be a top priority.

Probability being what it is, there’s simply no time to wait around for premium hands. We have to be prepared to lower our expectations and thus widen our range. We can’t be afraid to get involved as it’s necessary to join in the fight in the heart of the battlefield – tentatively keeping our distance means ultimately being left behind.

A good way to have more confidence when first trying to get used to the ‘busier’ short-handed tournaments and the fact that we often have to back up what seem to be good but not quite good enough hands is to remind ourselves that, with only five opponents to deal with, the odds of coming up against very strong hands are also considerably reduced compared with traditional full tables. With this in mind we shouldn’t be afraid to play holdings that we’d normally steer clear of.

Next time we’ll turn to the importance of reading other players.

Good luck at the tables!

Angus Dunnington (AngusD at the tables)
32Red Poker Ambassador

More great software features at 32Red Poker!

October 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, Featured, News, Poker School

Recently there have been yet more new and improved features at 32Red Poker, and it’s well worth taking the time to check them out as the point is to both make our playing experience more convenient as well as streamline typical practicalities in order to increase our thinking time at the tables.

I have already written about the usefulness of the Pocket Card Manager – especially to beginners and lesser experienced players. This is a great tool that allows us to set out which hands – in each table position from Small Blind around to the Button – we never wish to get involved with so that these holdings are automatically folded pre-flop (even with random timings for the actual play!). For anyone interested in multi-tabling this is a great piece of software. We can access this feature via the Global Table Options menu from Preferences in the Lobby.

There is also a handy Multi Table Launcher that does what it says on the tin. Once seated, the icon appears at the bottom right-hand side of the table, accompanied by a speech bubble. Clicking this icon lets us automatically open further similar tables without the inconvenience of having to go the Lobby and look out for them while we’re busy playing.

Another tool that is appreciated more once we actually begin to use it, particularly when combined with the Multi Table Launcher, is the Auto Buy-in feature. This enables us to set up a pre-determined buy-in amount so that, when enabled, as soon as we choose a table we skip the usual buy-in procedure and are instead immediately seated with whatever buy-in we pre-selected (anything from the minimum to the maximum), and consequently ready to get involved in the next hand.

As well as being accessed via the Global Table Options menu from Preferences in the Lobby, this feature is also available when first sitting down at a table in the Bring Money to Table box by clicking on the ‘Seat me then set up Auto Buy-in’ button.

Tournament fans can make use of the Auto Rebuy function with which we can opt to rebuy in tournaments automatically – note that it is possible to use Redbacks as well as money. This option is available when clicking ‘Join’ when registering for a rebuy tournament.

To set up, simply click ‘Configure Auto Rebuys and Add-ons’ for the options. Of course it is convenient to be able to select how many automatic rebuys we want for a tournament, but we must remember not to get carried away!

Good luck at the tables!

Angus Dunnington (AngusD at the tables)
32Red Poker Ambassador


No Limit Tournaments: M-Factor II

September 5, 2011 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

No Limit Tournaments: M-Factor II

The M-factor in multi-table tournaments is a ratio tool we use to determine where we stand in terms of our stack size relative to how many orbits we can afford to sit in without making further bets. Using the formula…

M = stack/(SB + BB + Antes)

…we can define five M-factor zones, the level of M determining the most appropriate way to play.

The Green Zone

Here our M is at least 20 and, not surprisingly, we can play pretty much ‘normally’ here in that we won’t be restricted by our stack size when it comes to making certain plays. Thus it boils down to our own particular style and comfort levels so that we can see a number of flops with marginal hands if we so wish. Moreover, when M is over 20 it is quite okay to throw in a reraise pre-flop safe in the knowledge that we’re not putting too much at risk. Note that this flexibility allows us to try to exploit the occasional stealing opportunity in order to remain in the Green Zone.

Now that we are making ourselves aware of the significance of zones, it is important to consider our opponents’ situation, too. For example it would be a mistake when we are in the Green Zone to limp in with a small pocket pair when the only players left to act are down in the Orange Zone, for instance, as we need to be up against other sizeable stacks when we hit to make up for the times we don’t.

The Yellow Zone

It is by no means disastrous to slip into the Yellow Zone, as even when M is hovering over 10 we still have enough ammunition to make our presence felt. Nevertheless, it is now no longer feasible to stick too rigidly to a tight strategy, while we simply have too small a stack to liberally limp into pots. With this in mind, in the Yellow Zone it is important to loosen up a little and be prepared to get jiggy with a wider range of starting hands.

The Orange Zone

With M barely covering half a dozen orbits it is time to take the bull by the horns. Clearly our stack is way too small to enable us to do anything more complicated or subtle than good old-fashioned aggression. Indeed at this level we practically have little more option than to be prepared to push all-in pre-flop, as any kind of action by us would effectively mean we are anyway going to have to commit the rest of our meagre stack to the cause. Therefore marginal, speculative hands can’t be played with any flexibility as would be the case in the Green Zone, for example – we simply have to either fold or make sure all our chips (eventually) fly in pre-flop!

The Red Zone

Here M is between 1 and 5… not for nothing is this the Red Zone! If we want to be practical, then we should be on red alert way before we find ourselves drifting into this unenviable but pretty simple situation. I say  simple because here it is a case pre-flop of fold or all-in. Hands we might normally automatically dump such as J7 are worth pushing with if, when the action comes to us, nobody has entered the pot. Just by picking up the tiny pot we have improved our M, while we have a fighting chance of doubling up if called.

The aim is to escape from the Red Zone as there is absolutely no time to hang around (there’s no use ‘patiently’ waiting for aces if by the time they arrive M has gone down to 2). Remember – better Red than Dead, so have faith in just about any two cards and go for it. Passivity will get us nowhere fast.

The Dead Zone

Hmmm. It will happen, for one reason or another – ‘hopefully’ after being on the wrong side of an all-in battle as then we would at least have been doing it properly, as opposed to letting ourselves get blinded down the zones. So here, when M isn’t even being measured in whole numbers, we must be looking to get all-in immediately and see what fate has in store.

Essentially we want to be trying to maintain (and build on) a position in the comfort of the Green Zone. When we find ourselves in lower zones, then the mission is simply to move up. The more dangerous the zone, the more chances we should be prepared to take to improve our situation.

Good luck at the tables!

Angus Dunnington (AngusD)
32Red Poker Ambassador


No Limit Tournaments: M-Factor

September 2, 2011 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, Featured, News, Poker School

No Limit Tournaments: M-Factor

Paul Magriel might be known to backgammon fans as a legend, or to poker fans as the character they’ve seen on televised tournaments shouting ‘quack! quack!’ when making a bet beginning with 22. To complete the skill games trilogy, I met him in Cannes a decade or so ago during an international chess tournament he found himself in because he’d been giving a grandmaster friend of mine backgammon lessons in return for chess coaching. A competent club player, he was out of his depth but nevertheless enjoyed the challenge and was eager to analyse his games.

After losing the first few rounds he left suddenly because – if I remember correctly – an incredibly rich would-be player had ‘challenged’ him to a big money game in Paris. Boundless enthusiasm and a great brain still don’t make it possible to fast-track your way to becoming a pro chess player, but Magriel was able to apply his attributes to poker, which is a good thing for us because he came up with the concept of ‘M’ for tournament players.

This has been investigated by the great Dan Harrington, and has proved incredibly useful as a means to see where we stand in a multi-table tournament with regards to our stack size and, subsequently, how to play appropriately.

To calculate M we use the formula:

M = stack/(SB + BB + Antes)

As we can see this simply divides the amount of chips in a pot before any action into our stack size, and thus indicates how many orbits we would survive without being further involved.

Different players have different approaches but, using Harrington’s treatment as a guide, we can then categorise M into five distinct ‘zones’ that, depending on the ratio, require different strategies:

Green zone: M is at least 20.

Yellow zone: M is between 10 and 20.

Orange zone: M is between 5 and 10.

Red zone: M is between 1 and 5.

Dead zone: M is less than 1.

 Clearly, being in the Green zone, with at least 20 orbits to look forward to, affords us more room for manoeuvre than would be the case if we found ourselves in the more urgent Orange Zone. And unlike the old US anti-communist slogan, in poker it is better to be Red than Dead. Indeed it should be obvious that, when in the Red zone, we should be prepared to move all-in rather than passively find that we are Dead…

Next time we’ll take a closer look at this concept in action. Until then, don’t panic!

Good luck at the tables.

Angus Dunnington (AngusD)
32Red Poker Ambassador


Big Events: Online and Off

July 31, 2011 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News

Big Events: Online and Off

Whether you’re a parent worn out by school holidays, can’t stop sneezing during summer, have been to more than enough barbecues or simply love playing tournaments on 32Red, then make sure that you free up some time in your calendar so that you don’t miss out on the online Summer Festival at 32Red. Starting on the 26th August, the continues until the 29th, with a total of eight events and over €600,000 in guaranteed prizes!

With something for everyone, the tournament formats aren’t limited to No Limit, as Omaha also features and you can even try out Razz. The festival culminates in the Main Event, which starts on the 28th and spans two days (for those who survive long enough), and has a whopping €500,000 in guaranteed prize money! For those who like to play themselves into form and save money in the process, there are great value qualifiers on the go throughout the day – plus, as well as qualifying via the ‘Multi Event’ satellites, it is possible to earn a free entry ticket by winning 5 consecutive Multiplicity games. Click here for details.

Meanwhile, there’s still time to win packages for two excellent offline events. Worth €3,100, you can start your qualifying quest for as little as €2.50! If successful you can decide between a WSOPE side event in Cannes this October or the Gibraltar Poker Masters in September (of course with the right amount of skill/luck both packages can be won).. Players winning two packages can of course attend both events.

The Gibraltar Poker Masters 2011 package includes a €1,100 High Roller 3-Day Event buy-in as well as travel money, four nights accommodation, casino chips and dinner, while if you fancy the French Riviera, the Cannes package features a €1,090 buy-in into a WSOPE side event, plus travel money and five nights accommodation. I can say from experience that both packages are well worth winning, having played poker in Gibraltar and – during my days as a pro chess player – numerous international chess tournaments in Cannes.

You’ve got to be in it to win it…

Good luck at the tables!

Angus Dunnington (AngusD)
32Red Poker Ambassador


FREE POKER QUIZ!

July 7, 2011 by  
Filed under News

Congratulations to johnjohn for winning our previous Poker Quiz (click here for details).

32Red Poker Quiz

Welcome to 32Red’s regularly updated Poker Quiz section where we ask you all sorts of poker questions and all you have to do is answer them correctly to enter our draw for free cash prizes & tournament tickets!

Are you ready?

 

What is 32Red Poker celebrating in July?

A: 2 Billionth Hand?
B: 3 Billionth Hand?
C: 4 Billionth Hand?

Click here for a clue!

Post your answers below and if we pick your name out of the hat and you’ve posted the correct answer, we’ll give you 2 free tickets for our daily €20,000 Jackpot Tournaments!

Everyone’s a Bounty

June 15, 2011 by  
Filed under News


Everyone’s a Bounty – €50 Added!

Don’t miss one of our player’s favourite poker tournaments – Everyone’s a Bounty – it runs every Friday at 9pm (UK time) and offers a €50 added prizepool!

Everyone plays with a bounty on their heads, hunting other bounties as the game progresses.  Win €5 with every player that you knockout but be careful not to get yourself knocked out, or you’ll be out of the game!

The more players you knockout, the bigger the rewards.  Check out the tournament details below…

Tournament Details

Date & Time Fridays at 21:00 (UK time)
Buyin €5 + €0.50, freezeout
Details 2000 chips, 10 minute blind levels
Game Type No-limit Texas Hold’em
Prize pool €50 Added
Bounty Win €5 with every knockout!

 


No Limit Tournaments: Flopping a flush

June 8, 2011 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

No Limit Tournaments: Flopping a flush

Flopping a flush is both rather rare and exciting and, consequently, most players are ill-prepared to deal with this scenario. It takes Zen-like wisdom to decide to abandon a flopped flush on a safe looking flop (i.e. with no pair showing) as the only hand we should really be afraid of is a higher flush. While many players opt for ‘tricky’ play with a check, or are afraid that aggression reveals their massive hand, we should be adding to the pot. This is for two reasons. First, given that we are very likely well ahead, we want to build the pot in such a way as to maximise any gains, which means forcing flush (and straight) draws to pay handsomely for the privilege of drawing, for example, as they may be far less willing to invest having missed the first bite of the cherry (which if we check we’re giving them at no cost).
Even if we are not overly confident in our flush because it is at the low end, for instance, then we should still bet as this is the only way to garner useful information about the strength – or otherwise – of the opposition‘s hand. Instead, checking the flop and check-calling the turn doesn’t help us at all in making a critical decision on the river as our opponent could be bluffing in the face of perceived weakness or in fact have us beaten. It is not unusual when taking such a line to learn the hard way after calling an all-in bet. It is preferable, if checking the flop, to bet the turn and assume the initiative, allowing us to approach the river with the confidence afforded us by extracting information on our own terms.

Catching a flopped flush in a multi-way pot obviously gets a bit more complicated as – apart from the board – we need to take stack sizes into consideration, the likelihood being that someone will be practically pot-committed and others able to let their hand go if the action is too much for them. Obviously this becomes situational as a host of factors comes into play, while engineering situations in which we want this or that player to fold or continue will be determined mainly by the strength and potential vulnerability of our hand.

Meanwhile, the decision to bet or check is influenced by our position and any previous action, and in turn how certain players have played thus far, as well as how we judge they might address the flop. For example checking in early position with the nut flush when a short-stack is on the button is quite feasible. Typically our neighbour will min-bet, get a caller, the short-stack will make a small raise and then we can shove or even throw in another modest raise to re-start the betting in the knowledge that the short-stack is going to continue building the pot by going all-in.

Good luck at the tables!

Angus Dunnington
32Red Poker Ambassador


No Limit Tournaments: Call all-in with AK? Maybe not.

May 25, 2011 by  
Filed under Angus Dunnington, News, Poker School

AK is a strong starting hand, which is why we like to call it Big Slick (or even Machine Gun…) and are all too willing to send it out into battle with a virtual mountain of chips. However, it is also an over-rated holding that can lead us into all sorts of trouble if we blindly assume it’s too powerful to surrender. It’s worth noting that, while we tend not to get very excited when dealt 33, we’ll put our tournament lives on the line with, say, AsKh, which is a 47% dog against 2c2d – a hand with far less streetwise nicknames such as Quack Quack!

So, apart from the fact that AK can see us facing elimination or losing a big pot at the hands of even tiny pairs, it isn’t a coincidence in the long-run if we investigate our AK losses and find that we keep coming up against AA or KK. Add a third player to the mix and AK is even more vulnerable.

With this in mind, the next time an ostensibly marathon run of awful hole cards ends with the arrival – accompanied with a fanfare – of AK, and there’s been an all-in bet followed by a reraise all-in, for instance, we should opt (instead of Big Slick) for the more sober Anna Kournikova (looks good but rarely wins) or Walking Back to Houston (from Dallas, after losing with AK to AA). At least this makes us conscious of the dangers so that we can properly weigh up the necessary factors before acting.

One such in this situation is that two players have already thought it worth their getting fully involved in the pot, so it won’t be a heads-up race. Let’s say this is not the first time the initial raiser has gone all-in pre-flop, having done so recently with QcJc. If we assign him this hand here, the second player a pocket pair – let’s say 9s9d (an absolutely typical tournament scenario these days) – and we have AhKd, then even here, up against two very average hands, the win expectancies are around QcJc/32%, 9s9d/31% and AhKd/37%. Of course we are favourite for the pot, but interpreting these figures another way shows that nearly 2/3 of the time we’ll lose, which could mean exiting the tournament. Swap the first player’s queen for the Ac and expectancies change to around 25%, 43% and 32% respectively!

However tempting, calling all-in with AK against two players is rarely worth the risk, with a typically ‘good’ scenario making Big Slick only a marginal favourite. You’ve been warned.

Good luck at the tables,

AngusD


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